Problem Child 2 (1991)

While the original “Problem Child” filmed in mostly around Dallas, Texas, the sequel, “Problem Child 2,” was filmed primarily around Orlando, Florida.

Ben Healy, played by John Ritter, moves with Junior into this lakefront home.

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LOCATION: 1216 Lancaster Dr, Orlando, FL 32806

The school Junior attends is Kaley Elementary School.

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LOCATION: 1600 E Kaley St, Orlando, FL 32806

This is the curb where Ben wrestles to get Junior out of the car and rips the entire seat out.

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This entrance is where the bully tries to push the satellite onto Junior from the roof above.

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Several scenes were also filmed at the Harry P. Leu Gardens.  You have to pay to enter the grounds and the property is bigger than you might expect.  Grabbing a map from the reception area might help you find your way, but if you’re seeking out the “Problem Child 2” locations, you might end up doing a bit more walking than you anticipated.

The Leu House Museum is where Ben prepares for his wedding to Lawanda.

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LOCATION: 1920 N Forest Ave, Orlando, FL 32803

The wedding itself is set in another section of the same property.

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The love rock Junior and Trixie visit is also at the Harry P. Leu Gardens.  This is where the rock was placed, but the prop is long since gone.

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Jack Kerouac

There are so many sites related to author Jack Kerouac scattered across the United States, one could probably dedicate an entire website to it.  Here we pay a homage to a man who not only influenced a generation, but helped shape American counterculture.

This residence in the town of Lowell, Massachusetts is where Kerouac was born on March 12, 1922.  His family lived on the second floor.

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LOCATION: 9 Lupine Rd, Lowell, MA 01850

A plaque can be found on the front porch of the house.

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Kerouac’s family frequently relocated around Lowell.  By age four, they moved to this house, said to be Kerouac’s third home, which the author referred to as “sad Beaulieu.” Beaulieu was the name of the street and Jack’s older brother Gerard died of rheumatic fever while they lived there.

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LOCATION: 34 Beaulieu St, Lowell, MA 01850

The Kerouac family relocated to Jamaica, New York (near Queens), where they lived in the upstairs unit above what was then a drugstore.  It was here that Kerouac wrote the “The Town and the City” and began crafting the initial pieces of his most famous novel, “On the Road.”

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LOCATION: 133-01 Cross Bay Blvd, Jamaica, NY 11417

Kerouac would finish “On the Road” in New York City at 454 W 20th St, New York, NY 10011.  Nearby, at the corner of 7th Ave and W 20th St is where Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty say their goodbyes at the end of the novel.

As is well documented, “On the Road” was not published for many years after it’s completion.  By the time it was first published in 1957, Kerouac had moved to Orlando, Florida.  It was in this home where he lived when “On the Road” became a bestseller and skyrocketed the author to instant fame.  Kerouac also began the manuscript for “The Dharma Bums” at this home.  The historic nature of the house was not known to Kerouac historians until 1996, when research for an article about the author led to the discovery.

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LOCATION: 1418 Clouser Ave, Orlando, FL 32804

Kerouac’s final home, where the author resided in 1969, can be found in St. Petersburg, Florida.  The house, reportedly still owned by the Kerouac family, is said to still contain the desk of the author, as well as other personal belongings.  Mostly sitting empty since the 1970s, the house is in need of renovation.  If upkeep can be successfully funded, the home has been considered to be opened up for public visitation in the future.

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LOCATION: 5169 10th Ave N, St. Petersburg, FL 33710

After Kerouac’s passing, he was relocated back to his birth town of Lowell, Massachusetts for his funeral and burial.  His grave can be found at the Edson Cemetery.  The trails around the cemetery are laid out like streets.  The author’s grave site can be found near the corner of Lincoln and 7th, six graves up and three graves in.  It is rumored that singer Bob Dylan still visits Kerouac’s grave twice a year.

Two grave stones can be found there for the iconic writer.  Here is the original.

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LOCATION: Edson Cemetery, 1375 Gorham St, Lowell, MA 01852 (Lot 76, Range 96, Grave 1)

Just past it is a larger headstone, which was added in 2014.  It features an engraving of the author’s signature, along with the words “The road is life.”

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These locations only scratch the surface of all the Kerouac sites to be discovered all across the United States, but it is of course the man’s writing which stands the greatest test of time.

M*A*S*H*

Malibu Creek State Park today is primarily used for hikers and horse riders, but you’ll find quite a bit of movie and TV history there, as the area was once home to the Fox Ranch, formerly owned by 20th Century Fox.

For decades the land was used as an exterior backlot, hosting many productions, including the original “Planet of the Apes,” “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” and several “Tarzan” films.  One of the most famous locations was the area that stood in as South Korea for exterior scenes for the TV series “M*A*S*H*,” based on the 1970 Robert Altman film.

The area has long since closed as a backlot and is now owned and operated as state property.  The state has made an admirable effort to maintain the old “M*A*S*H*” filming site.  From the main parking lot on Crags Road, the set can be found by hiking about 2.4 miles (4.75 round trip).  It takes a couple hours, but the trail is mostly flat, so it’s not a physically demanding journey and should be suitable for most visitors.

Unfortunately in late 2018, same fire that destroyed much of the Paramount Ranch also tore through Malibu Creek State Park, damaging parts of the “M*A*S*H*” set.  However, unlike Paramount Ranch, the remnants around the M*A*S*H* set actually survived the fire and remain in tact for the most part, albeit with some heat damage.  It’s actually not the first wildfire to come through the area.  During the filming of the show’s famous final episode in the 1980s, wildfires were approaching, which were written into the show.  Some of the original vehicles from the show were severely burned in those fires.  In spite of that, they remain on display to this day.  So the M*A*S*H* set will, in all likelihood, live on for future visitors, as the area slowly recovers.

We had the fortunate opportunity to visit the old set grounds long before the 2018 fires.  Here we’ll take a look at a bit of what could be seen there.

LOCATION: Malibu Creek State Park, Agoura Hills, CA 91301 (currently fire damaged)

The first thing approaching hikers would see is this jeep, which was added as a prop and was not original to the the show.

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This vehicle, on the other hand, was original to the show.  You can see it suffered heavy damages from the 1980s wildfire.

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Here is another burned car frame at the site, also original to the show.

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This sign was a recreation.  It suffered heat damage in the 2018 fire, but will hopefully be repaired or replaced in the future.

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A lot of the surrounding rock formations and geography will also be familiar to fans of the show.  While Malibu Creek State Park slowly finds sings of life again, the “M*A*S*H*” site too will hopefully be restored to it’s former glory.