The Amityville Horror

The real house where the Amityville murders took place in 1974 can be found in Amityville, New York. On November 13, 1974, Ronald DeFeo Jr. killed six of his family members inside the home. He was convicted of the murders and died in custody in March 2021. In December 1975, George and Kathy Lutz purchased the home, leaving less than a month later, claiming they experienced paranormal activity, although the truthfulness of their claim has been widely disputed. Their story was made into a book by Jay Anson in 1977 and began a series of film adaptations in 1979. The original address of the home was 112 Ocean Ave, but like many famous true crime homes, the address has since been changed, to 108 Ocean Ave. While the home has since been remodeled some, it still maintains many features of how it appeared in famous photographs from the 1970s.

LOCATION: Formerly 112 Ocean Ave, Amityville, NY 11701 (now defunct), changed to 108 Ocean Ave, Amityville, NY 11701

For the 1979 film “The Amityville Horror,” initial attempts to film in the real town of Amityville, New York proved unsuccessful, after the town denied permission to film any scenes there, in an ongoing effort to distance themselves from further infamy. Instead, a similar looking home in New Jersey was chosen. Today in Amityville, there are “no stopping or standing” signs throughout the neighborhood, which has a reputation for not always being hospitable to tourists.

If you do visit the home, be aware that any illegal parking is strictly enforced. The home is part of one of the most infamous American crime cases in modern history and remains a major attraction to true crime and paranormal enthusiasts. However, the town clearly prefers to distance itself from the notoriety, which should be kept in mind if you plan to visit.

Related articles: The Amityville Horror (1979)

Marie Antoinette (2006)

In the 2006 Sofia Coppola film “Marie Antoinette,” Kirsten Dunst is seen wearing this dress. The costume could be seen on display at the Sony Pictures Studio Tour in Culver City, California.

LOCATION: 10202 W Washington Blvd, Culver City, CA 90232

Nirvana

The legacy of Nirvana is deeply rooted in Seattle and the surrounding areas of Washington. At the Museum of Pop Culture in Seattle, they’ve held an ongoing exhibit on the band, called “Nirvana: Taking Punk to the Masses.” Here we’ll take a look at some of those items on display, as well as a couple locations related to the band.

This cardigan was worn by Kurt Cobain between 1991 and 1994.

LOCATION: 325 5th Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109

This Fender Competition Mustang was played by Kurt Cobain on the “Smells Like Teen Spirit” music video shoot on August 17, 1991 in Culver City, California. One of Cobain’s speakers is below. To the left is a flyer for a casting call to be in the video, with a record release party flyer for “Nevermind” on the right.

The gold acoustic guitar on the left was played by Krist Novoselic at the MTV Unplugged concert in New York City, November 18, 1993. The Buck Owens American acoustic guitar on the right, owned by Novoselic, was played by Pat Smear with Nirvana on the “In Utero” tour, as well as the MTV Unplugged performance. Between them is a hat worn by Cobain in the early 1990s.

Kurt Cobain lived with his wife Courtney Love at this home, located in Denny-Blaine neighborhood of Seattle. Cobain committed suicide in the home sometime around April 5, 1994 in the greenhouse, which sat separate from the main house at the back of the property. Love had the greenhouse demolished after Cobain’s death.

LOCATION: 171 Lake Washington Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112

Minor portions of the home can be seen from the front gate, as well as the park beside it, but you can’t really get a full view.

Right next to the property is Viretta Park, where this bench stands in memorial to Cobain and Nirvana, with fans writing messages on it. There’s no parking available in front of the home or Viretta Park. The nearest available parking is over at Denny Blaine Park (200 Lake Washington Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112).

LOCATION: 151 Lake Washington Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112

Hostel (2005)

The interrogation chair from the 2005 horror film “Hostel” could be found on display at the Museum of Pop Culture in Seattle, Washington. Not only was it used in several scenes for the film, it was used in real life interrogations in the former Czechoslovakia during the Cold War era. The chair was on loan for display from director Eli Roth himself.

LOCATION: 325 5th Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109