Rabbit Hole (2010)

The 2010 John Cameron Mitchell film “Rabbit Hole” stars Nicole Kidman and Aaron Eckhart as a grieving couple coping with the death of their child. Becca and Howie Corbett, played by Kidman and Eckhart respectively, live in this home, located in Queens, New York.

LOCATION: 28 Shore Rd, Queens, NY 11363

The Irishman (2019)

The 2019 Martin Scorsese film “The Irishman” was mostly shot north of New York City, in small towns such as White Plains, Suffern and Hempstead, with a bit of additional filming in New Jersey and Florida. While noted for using de-aging effects on the actors, the film likewise utilized visual effects on several of the locations to make them more period authentic. Sometimes what you see in real life does not immediately match what appears on screen. However, the filmmakers used every tool at their disposal, combining a unique mixture of visual effects, practical set dressing and in some cases, simply finding great locations that didn’t need anything changed to bring about the appropriate look. The production reportedly traveled to over 200 different locations in the film, so we obviously weren’t able visit every spot, but we did as many as we could.

Frank Sheeran, played by Robert De Niro, lives at this home, located in White Plains.

LOCATION: 63 Lincoln Ave, White Plains, NY 10606

After his truck has some mechanical issues, Frank first meets Russell, played by Joe Pesci, at the Texaco gas station, with a Stuckey’s dessert restaurant on the right. The real location is not a gas station at all, rather it is part of Great Hunger Memorial Park, just off the Saw Mill River Pkwy. The gas pumps were added by the production, as well as some set dressing to bring the buildings back to life, but the area is still instantly recognizable from the film. It’s pretty easy to access and open to the public, so we highly recommend visiting the park.

LOCATION: Great Hunger Memorial Park, Saw Mill River Pkwy, Irvington, NY 10533 (GPS coordinates: 41.024472, -73.846028)

Frank works his way up the criminal ranks, meeting Skinny Razor at the Friendly Lounge. Again, the building was repurposed to appear a bit older for the film, but is still recognizable. Several other locations from the film were shot in this same area, including the church in the background.

LOCATION: 880 Woodward Ave, Queens, NY 11385

The baptism scene was shot inside of this church. The exterior of the church appears in a couple scenes as well, but always in the background.

LOCATION: 5815 Catalpa Ave, Queens, NY 11385

Russell collects money and runs some of his operations at Penn Drape & Curtains. This was filmed in the town of Suffern and once again, a couple other locations from the film are on the same street.

LOCATION: 104 Lafayette Ave, Suffern, NY 10901

After Anastasia is killed in a barber shop, Russell is seen exiting Penn Drape & Curtains to talk to a man parked out front and calm things down.

LOCATION: Lafayette Ave / Suffern Pl, Suffern, NY 10901

After a man fails to pay up on a debt owed to Skinny Razor, Frank forces the man into his car in front of this building. This is again located just around the corner from the Friendly Lounge location in Queens, with the same church appearing in the background.

LOCATION: 881 Onderdonk Ave, Queens, NY 11385

Still in the same area, directly across the street from the Friendly Lounge location, is the store where Frank beats the owner on the sidewalk for shoving his daughter. Quite a bit of set decoration was added for this scene, making the storefront look much different in the film.

LOCATION: 885 Woodward Ave, Ridgewood, NY 11385

Whispers offers Frank a side job at “Philadelphia’s Melrose Diner,” which is actually the former Goodfellas Diner in Maspeth. The diner was famous for its appearance in another Scorsese film, “Goodfellas,” changing it’s name from the Maspeth Diner after the success of that film. However, it got damaged by a fire in 2018. Since then, the building has remained closed down and appears in disrepair these days. Only the exterior was revisited for this film, the interiors for the scene were filmed at 106 E 2nd St, Mineola, NY 11501.

LOCATION: 56-26 Maspeth Ave, Maspeth, NY 11378

Back in Suffern, Frank makes the rounds to collect more money for Russell at Fair Furriers. This is located very close to the Penn Drape & Curtains location.

LOCATION: 88 Lafayette Ave, Suffern, NY 10901

Frank begins spending a lot of time working with Jimmy Hoffa, played by Al Pacino. Hoffa eats with Frank’s family at this ice cream stand. It really is called Weir’s and very little of it was altered for the film. The spot is a bit of a distance away from most of the other locations, however, in Salisbury Mills.

LOCATION: 2159 NY-94, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577

Hoffa is once again enjoying ice cream with Frank when they learn of J.F.K.’s assassination on a television inside.

LOCATION: 84 Hillside Ave, Williston Park, NY 11596

Hoffa’s teamsters headquarters was actually the Hempstead Town Hall.

LOCATION: 1 Washington St, Hempstead, NY 11550

Hoffa gets sentenced to prison, with the exterior scenes filmed at the East Jersey State Prison. A real prison, the location has appeared in numerous films, including “Ocean’s Eleven,” “Malcolm X,” “Rounders,” “He Got Game,” “The Hurricane” and more.

LOCATION: 1100 Woodbridge Rd, Rahway, NJ 07065

Umbertos Clam House, where Frank performs a hit in front of shocked onlookers, made heavy use of CGI to modify the ground level, incorporating what was a set into the interior views of location. The exterior can be found at 90 Orchard St, New York, NY 10002.

After the hit, Russell is seen at a payphone, making a call to an unknown person in front of the Sunoco gas station. Quite a bit of set dressing was added to make it look like vintage gas station. The real building is part of a bagel shop. The business owns a couple buildings side by side. The one used in the film sits off to the left, near the intersection of Park Ave / Orange Turnpike. The building is currently vacant, although the main building to the right is still operational.

LOCATION: 203 Orange Turnpike, Sloatsburg, NY 10974 (to the left, near the intersection of Park Ave / Orange Turnpike)

Frank buys hot dogs for Jimmy at Lum’s, supposedly located in Florida. The scene was actually filmed in Tuxedo Park, New York, just a short distance away from the above Sunoco location. Visual effects were used to erase the mountain and trees in the background, substituting them for palm trees. The building has also since been remodeled, making it even more tricky to match up.

LOCATION: 192 NY-17, Tuxedo Park, NY 10987 (since remodeled)

Hoffa is killed inside of this house, supposedly located in Michigan. The house seen in the film is actually located in White Plains, New York.

LOCATION: 83 Smith Ave, White Plains, NY 10605

Related articles: Raging Bull (1980), Goodfellas (1990), Casino (1995), The Departed (2006)

Jack Kerouac

There are so many sites related to author Jack Kerouac scattered across the United States, one could probably dedicate an entire website to it.  Here we pay a homage to a man who not only influenced a generation, but helped shape American counterculture.

This residence in the town of Lowell, Massachusetts is where Kerouac was born on March 12, 1922.  His family lived on the second floor.

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LOCATION: 9 Lupine Rd, Lowell, MA 01850

A plaque can be found on the front porch of the house.

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Kerouac’s family frequently relocated around Lowell.  By age four, they moved to this house, said to be Kerouac’s third home, which the author referred to as “sad Beaulieu.” Beaulieu was the name of the street and Jack’s older brother Gerard died of rheumatic fever while they lived there.

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LOCATION: 34 Beaulieu St, Lowell, MA 01850

The Kerouac family relocated to Jamaica, New York (near Queens), where they lived in the upstairs unit above what was then a drugstore.  It was here that Kerouac wrote the “The Town and the City” and began crafting the initial pieces of his most famous novel, “On the Road.”

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LOCATION: 133-01 Cross Bay Blvd, Jamaica, NY 11417

Kerouac would finish “On the Road” in New York City at 454 W 20th St, New York, NY 10011.  Nearby, at the corner of 7th Ave and W 20th St is where Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty say their goodbyes at the end of the novel.

As is well documented, “On the Road” was not published for many years after it’s completion.  By the time it was first published in 1957, Kerouac had moved to Orlando, Florida.  It was in this home where he lived when “On the Road” became a bestseller and skyrocketed the author to instant fame.  Kerouac also began the manuscript for “The Dharma Bums” at this home.  The historic nature of the house was not known to Kerouac historians until 1996, when research for an article about the author led to the discovery.

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LOCATION: 1418 Clouser Ave, Orlando, FL 32804

Kerouac’s final home, where the author resided in 1969, can be found in St. Petersburg, Florida.  The house, reportedly still owned by the Kerouac family, is said to still contain the desk of the author, as well as other personal belongings.  Mostly sitting empty since the 1970s, the house is in need of renovation.  If upkeep can be successfully funded, the home has been considered to be opened up for public visitation in the future.

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LOCATION: 5169 10th Ave N, St. Petersburg, FL 33710

After Kerouac’s passing, he was relocated back to his birth town of Lowell, Massachusetts for his funeral and burial.  His grave can be found at the Edson Cemetery.  The trails around the cemetery are laid out like streets.  The author’s grave site can be found near the corner of Lincoln and 7th, six graves up and three graves in.  It is rumored that singer Bob Dylan still visits Kerouac’s grave twice a year.

Two grave stones can be found there for the iconic writer.  Here is the original.

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LOCATION: Edson Cemetery, 1375 Gorham St, Lowell, MA 01852 (Lot 76, Range 96, Grave 1)

Just past it is a larger headstone, which was added in 2014.  It features an engraving of the author’s signature, along with the words “The road is life.”

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These locations only scratch the surface of all the Kerouac sites to be discovered all across the United States, but it is of course the man’s writing which stands the greatest test of time.