Bobby (2006)

The 2006 drama “Bobby,” about the day of the assassination of U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy, filmed at the former Ambassador Hotel, where the real assassination took place. The film was notable for being the last production to shoot at the Ambassador, before it was demolished. Demolition had actually already begun at the time of filming, but many parts of the hotel had not yet been destroyed yet. So the production filmed in areas they could at the real hotel, then used multiple other locations to stand in as well.

The Ambassador was a staple of film and television, appearing in such films as “The Graduate,” “Forrest Gump,” “True Romance,” “Seven,” “Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas,” “True Lies,” “L.A. Story,” “Catch Me If You Can,” “The Mask” and dozens more. After closing for good in 1989, the Ambassedor was used primarily for filming throughout the 1990s. The film crews were apparently not always considerate of the property, leaving it in poor condition after wrapping. Eventually the hotel was in such disrepair, despite a long struggle to preserve the property, it was eventually settled upon to be demolished. Only this post and statue from the original building remain at the location.

LOCATION: 3400 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90010 (now demolished)

Many more locations were used to composite the hotel, including the MacArthur in Los Angeles, formerly known as the Park Plaza Hotel. No longer a functioning hotel, the MacArthur today serves primarily as a property for hosting filming and special events.  However, it is under renovation with apparent plans to open a portion up once again as a hotel in 2022. The interior stood in for portions of the lobby of the Ambassador. It has been featured in many films, such as “Wild At Heart,” “Reservoir Dogs,” “Drive,” “Gangster Squad,” “Tango & Cash” and many more.

LOCATION: 607 S Park View St, Los Angeles, CA 90057

The Castle Green Apartments in Pasadena stood in for the hotels gardens area. Castle Green has likewise been featured in countless films, such as “The Little Rascals,” “True Romance,” “The Sting,” “Wild At Heart,” “Deja Vu,” “Sneakers,” “Bugsy,” “The Last Samurai,” “Puppet Master” and many more.

LOCATION: 99 S Raymond Ave, Pasadena, CA 91105

The Mighty Ducks (1992)

The 1992 hockey comedy “The Mighty Ducks,” starring Emilio Estevez, was filmed around Minnesota. In the film, Charlie’s mother Casey works at Mickey’s Dining Car. Gordon Bombay, played by Estevez, visits the diner to speak to Charlie, where he tells him he’s stepping down as coach of The Mighty Ducks. The same diner appeared in the sequels “D2: The Mighty Ducks” and “D3: The Mighty Ducks,” as well as such films as “Jingle All The Way” and “A Prairie Home Companion.” At this time, the diner is closed indefinitely, but it is rumored to potentially reopen sometime in 2022.

LOCATION: 36 7th St W, St Paul, MN 55102

The Breakfast Club (1985)

John Hughes’ 80s classic, “The Breakfast Club,” was filmed at the former Maine North High School, in Des Plaines, Illinois.  The filmmakers converted the high school gymnasium into the famous library set.  Today, the building is no longer a high school at all.   It’s used as an Illinois State Police Station.

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LOCATION: 9511 Harrison St, Des Plaines, IL 60016

One of the most highly disputed film locations you’re ever likely to encounter is the football field, where Judd Nelson does his famous fist pump at the end.  Some insisted it was filmed at the same high school as the rest of the production; Maine North.  Others insisted it was filmed at Glenbrook North High School in Northbrook, Illinois, where John Hughes himself was an alumni.  The majority of the arguments centered between these two locations, with former students from each school disputing which field was used.  Others still have claimed it was filmed at Maine South High School in Park Ridge or Maine West in Des Plaines.  The argument persisted until 2015, when the cinematographer of the film, Thomas Del Ruth, confirmed to the Chicago Tribune it was indeed the now-defunct Main North High School football field; the same location where principle production took place.  The field has since been demolished, but the confusion remains so strong, many people to this day still recreate the fist pump photograph at Glenbrook North.