Panic Room (2002)

The apartment from David Fincher’s 2002 home invasion thriller “Panic Room” is located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, near Central Park.  The apartment was only used for exterior shots in the film.

panicroom1

LOCATION: 38 W 94th St, New York, NY 10025

panicroom2

Here is a view of the entire building, although it’s never seen from this angle in the film.

panicroom3

The apartment interiors were filmed entirely on a custom built set in Manhattan Beach, California at Raleigh Manhattan Beach Studios (1600 Rosecrans Ave, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266).  That set has of course long since been removed.

The ending scene of the film shows Jodie Foster and Kristen Stewart sitting on a park bench.  They are seated in an area known as The Mall in Central Park; a tree-covered pedestrian walkway that leads to Bethesda Terrace.  The two are seated near the Robert Burns statue.  The benches have slightly changed from how they appeared in the film.

panicroom4

LOCATION: The Mall, Central Park, New York, NY 10022

Related articles: Seven (1995), The Game (1997), Fight Club (1999), Zodiac (2007), The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button (2008), The Social Network (2010), Mank (2020)

The Departed (2006)

Martin Scorsese’s classic Boston crime saga “The Departed,” a remake of the 2002 Hong Kong film “Infernal Affairs,” used a mixture of Boston and New York to comprise the locations of the film.  After Warner Bros. purchased the rights to the film, director Martin Scorsese deliberately avoided viewing it until after he completed “The Departed.”  Here we’ll take a look at some of the Boston locations from the film.

The Massachusetts State House plays a recurring role in the film, as Matt Damon’s character Colin Sullivan stares in awe at it and rents an upscale penthouse apartment with a view of it’s iconic golden dome at the center of the Boston skyline. The same building was featured in the films “Amistad,” “The Verdict” and “Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol.”

thedeparted1

LOCATION: 24 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02133

thedeparted2

Matt Damon’s penthouse “apartment” isn’t really an apartment at all.  It’s the library on the top floor of the Suffolk University Law School.  For this obvious reason, the building is never seen from an exterior view in the film, but this is what it looks like from the street.  Unfortunately, you must have a university ID to enter the building, so recreating the apartment view from the library is not possible for the public.

thedeparted3

LOCATION: 120 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02108

Frank Costello, played by Jack Nicholson, lives at this apartment overlooking the east waterfront of the Charlestown neighborhood of Boston.  The building is known as Flagship Wharf.  Much like Matt Damon’s apartment, the exteriors of this building are scarcely seen in the film.  However, some shots of the windows and a view out over the water can be seen as Costello talks on the phone to Sullivan.

thedeparted5

LOCATION: 197 8th St, Boston, MA 02129

Outside of Costello’s bar, two of Costello’s crew, Fitzy and Delahunt, stand and observe pedestrians walking by, claiming anyone who avoids looking at the pair are cops.  As Billy, played by Leonardo DiCaprio, exits the building without looking at them, Fitzy jokingly says to him “You’re a cop.”  Two buildings were actually used for this location; this exterior can be found in Boston, while the interior was an entirely different building in New York (Raul’s, 180 Prince St, New York, NY 10012).

thedeparted4

LOCATION: 17 Charles St, Boston, MA 02114

Late in the film, Billy meets Queenan, played by Martin Sheen on a rooftop of what is supposedly 344 Washington Street.  There is a hand-drawn sign in front with the numbers 344.  Costello’s crew is informed of the meeting and Delahunt mistakenly tells Billy to meet them at “314 Washington.”  Despite his error, Billy meets Costello’s crew at the correct address, cluing in Delahunt to Billy’s real identity.

The entrance to real building seen in the film is not on Washington Street, but rather along an alley running between Farnsworth Street and Thompson Place, just north of Congress Street in Boston’s Fort Point.

thedeparted6

LOCATION: 11 Farnsworth St, Boston, MA 02210 (this entrance is along a side alley of the building, running between Farnsworth Street and Thompson Place)

Billy narrowly escapes from the rooftop to avoid exposure as an undercover cop.  He races down a fire escape into this alley, just beside the entrance seen above.  The real building does not have a fire escape, but some skillful editing makes it appear as if this is where the fire escape reaches the streets.

thedeparted7

LOCATION: Alley between 11 Farnsworth St and 12 Thompson Pl, Boston, MA 02210

Just as Billy reaches the front of the building, he is shocked as Queenan is thrown from the rooftop.  His body falls in front of these windows.  Director Martin Scorsese had X marks taped over all the windows, as an homage to the 1932 film “Scarface.”

thedeparted8

Billy looks in horror back in front of the building entrance, as Costello’s crew pours out and meet up with him, unaware he was the undercover cop they were just seeking.  The police observe the scene and, against Sullivan’s orders, engage in a shootout with Costello’s crew.  Billy and Sullivan’s fateful meeting also takes place in this building and on the rooftop.

thedeparted9.jpg

Related articles: Casino (1995), Goodfellas (1990)

Melrose Place

In the early 1990s, in an effort to capitalize on the popularity of “Beverly Hills, 90210,” Aaron Spelling’s production company introduced a second series into the 90210 universe, known as “Melrose Place.”  The show inhabited the same universe, with characters overlapping for special guest appearances.  The original series ran from 1992 to 1999.

The famous apartment building from the show was supposedly located at 4616 Melrose Place in Los Angeles.  It turned out the producers made just a minor change to the real apartment’s address, which is located at 4616 Greenwood Place, in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.  The building is known as the El Pueblo Apartments.  There is also a real Melrose Place in West Hollywood, but you won’t find much there besides some commercial businesses on a short street.

As for the courtyard and interiors seen in the show, those were filmed on a sound stage.  There is no pool at the actual El Pueblo location and if you head past the front gates, you’ll quickly realize the rest of the building bears little resemblance to the show.

melroseplace1

LOCATION: 4616 Greenwood Pl, Los Angeles, CA 90027

Related articles: Beverly Hills, 90210

La La Land (2016)

Perhaps no movie has inspired more interest in it’s filming locations over the past several years than the love letter to the City of Los Angeles, “La La Land.”  The 2016 musical, starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, filmed at a wide variety of locations all over the greater Los Angeles and Orange County areas.  There are so many locations, in fact, one would be challenged to see them all in a single day.

The opening dance scene in traffic was filmed on the Judge Harry Pregerson Interchange, which connects the 110 and 105 freeways in Los Angeles.  The scenes were shot on the express ramp, which requires a non-cash toll.  The bus jump from “Speed” was also filmed on the same interchange when it was still under construction.

lalaland33

LOCATION: I-110 / I-105, Los Angeles, CA 90061

Mia, played by Emma Stone, works in a coffee shop on the Warner Bros. Studio lot.  The real building is indeed located on the Warner lot, however, it is not actually a coffee shop.  Rather it is just a building facade, used for any number of settings for productions, such as the toy store in “Small Soldiers.”  After the success of the film, however, Warner Bros. did decorate the building again to make it appear as it did in the film, for a few select weeks.  The building can be seen as part of their studio tour.

lalaland1

LOCATION: 4000 Warner Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505

Mia lives at this pink apartment building in Long Beach, known as El Cordova.

lalaland12

LOCATION: 1728 E 3rd St, Long Beach, CA 90802

The production filmed inside of unit 16.

lalaland14

Mia exits through the courtyard to join her roommates for a dance number.

lalaland13

She and her roommates then dance on E 3rd Street in front of her apartment.

lalaland15

Later in the film, Sebastian, played by Ryan Gosling, visits the apartment and picks up Mia at this back entrance to the building.

lalaland16

They then drive down this back alley.

lalaland17

Mia is walking alone past this famous mural in Hollywood, known as the “You Are A Star” mural, when she hears music inside.  She enters to find Sebastian playing piano.  The mural can be found at the corner of Hollywood Blvd and Wilcox Ave.  It can also be seen in the 1999 film “8MM.”

lalaland2

LOCATION: 1648 Wilcox Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90028

After reconnecting at a party, Sebastian walks with Mia along Mt Hollywood Drive towards the viewpoint where the film’s most famous scene takes place; the dance sequence over the night skyline.

lalaland6

A lot of creative license was used by the filmmakers here, as to get to the dance spot, the characters would’ve had to hike nearly an hour.  The spot is known as “Cathy’s Corner” in Griffith Park and it requires a bit of commitment if you wish to see it in person.

lalaland3

LOCATION: Cathy’s Corner, Mt Hollywood Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90027

There’s surprisingly little information online about how to accurately reach Cathy’s Corner.  Here we’ll attempt to detail that.  First and foremost, the spot is completely inaccessible by vehicle.  It is found along a fully paved road, but the road is gated off in all directions from motor vehicles.  Aside from park rangers, the road is primarily used by hikers and bicyclists.  Many GPS systems will offer different routes to drive to Cathy’s Corner, but rest assured, you’ll only get so far before you’ll encounter signs or gates preventing you from proceeding any further by car.

The viewpoint is accessible a couple different ways on foot, but the best way to do it is by parking at the Griffith Observatory.  The lot at the Observatory itself is almost always full.  You’re unlikely to find a spot in the actual lot.  However, you can park along East or West Observatory Road.  Unfortunately, these are now paid parking spaces.  There are a few free auxiliary lots, but those fill up quickly as well, plus they get you pretty far away from where you need to be to get to Cathy’s Corner.  You shouldn’t have a difficult time finding a paid parking space on Observatory Road, unless you’re arriving at peak evening hours.  Your best bet is to arrive early.

The easiest way to spot the trail head to reach Cathy’s Corner is to look for the tunnel when approaching Griffith Observatory.  Most traffic to reach the Observatory passes through it.  The tunnel was famously seen in Back To The Future Part 2, when Biff and Marty McFly (riding a hoverboard) fight over a sports almanac.  The very first road on your right, once you pass through the tunnel, is where you will need to hike.  It will either be gated off, or if the gates are open, a guard will be parked there, making sure no motorists attempt to drive up it.  The road is freely accessible to pedestrians on foot or bike, however, and you’ll likely see a lot of both.  You simply take that road for 2.2 miles to reach Cathy’s Corner.

It is a moderate hike.  Much of it is uphill, but considering you can walk a paved road the entire way, as well as the fact that there are resting spots and a water fountain along the way, it’s certainly manageable for most.  A couple bottles of water should suffice, unless it’s an extremely hot day.

If you use GPS for walking, it should be accurate from Griffith Observatory to Cathy’s Corner.  The hike takes anywhere from 90 minutes to a couple hours round trip, depending on your foot speed.  Cathy’s Corner can be found along a winding corner of Mt Hollywood Drive and should be distinct from all other corners for it’s skyline view.  Contrary to some information online, you do not likely need to worry about traffic, snakes or mountain lions.  It’s a heavily used trail on a paved road.  Your biggest challenge will be to simply bring adequate hydration and know where you are headed.  You can visit there at sunset or night, but you’ll likely have a difficult time finding a parking space.

Taking a closer look at the viewpoint, Sebastian hangs from a lamppost here, which was added by the production.

lalaland4

Sebastian and Mia then sit at a bench, which was located here.  The bench was likewise added by the production.

lalaland5

After their famous dance routine, Sebastian walks Mia to her car, which is also located at Cathy’s Corner, simply looking the opposite direction as the scenic view.  The production added cars and lampposts all along the road.

As a final tip to film location enthusiasts, a location from the David Lynch film “Lost Highway” can be found along the same trail, much closer to the Griffith Observatory.

lalaland7

Excited about their budding romance, Sebastian sneaks onto the Warner Bros lot to visit Mai at her workplace and the two take a stroll together down the studio backlot.  This area was famously also seen on Pink Floyd’s album cover for “Wish You Were Here.”

lalaland8

LOCATION: 4000 Warner Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505

The pair then go see a jazz show at the Lighthouse Cafe, near the Hermosa Pier in Hermosa Beach.  The Lighthouse Cafe really is a jazz bar.

lalaland9

LOCATION: 30 Pier Ave, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254

Right next to The Lighthouse Cafe is the Hermosa Beach Pier, where Sebastian does a dance at sunset.  Lampposts were added along the pier by the production.  After the success of the film, the City of Hermosa Beach began hosting occasional special events at the pier celebrating the film, where they add temporary lampposts.

lalaland30

LOCATION: 1 Pier Ave, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254

lalaland31

The two watch “Rebel Without A Cause” at the Rialto Theater in South Pasadena.  The theater has appeared in numerous other films, including “Scream 2” and “The Player.”

lalaland30

LOCATION: 1023 Fair Oaks Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

After watching the movie, the couple makes an impromptu trip to the Griffith Observatory to check out the filming locations.

griffith10

LOCATION: 2800 E Observatory Rd, Los Angeles, CA 90027

Sebastian drives his convertible, with Mia in tow, down the sidewalk on the right.

griffith6

They then dance around this pendulum inside the Observatory.

griffith12

The two gaze up at this mural inside.

griffith13

They also pause to take a look at this Tesla Coil.

griffith14

During a romantic “summer” montage, the two can be seen walking along the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena.

lalaland29

LOCATION: 504 W Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91105

The pair can also be seen visiting the Watts Towers.

lalaland10

LOCATION: 1727 E 107th St, Los Angeles, CA 90002

Sebastian and Mia can also be seen riding up Angels Flight in downtown Los Angeles.  They dance together briefly at the top.

lalaland11.jpg

LOCATION: 50 S Grand Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90013

Directly across the street from Angels Flight is the Grand Central Market, where another scene in the montage takes place.  A popular eating spot, Grand Central Market has appeared in many films, including “Color Of Night,” “City Of Angels,” “I Am Sam” and many more.

lalaland32

LOCATION: 317 S Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90013

Mia walks past this motel as she tries to call Sebastion.

LOCATION: 995 N Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90012

Later in the film, Mia, now a successful actress, can be seen staying at the Chateau Marmont in Hollywood.

somewhere1

LOCATION: 8221 Sunset Blvd, West Hollywood, CA 90046

Near the end of the film, Mia accidentally stumbles upon Sebastian, who has opened his own jazz bar, called Seb’s.  In reality, Seb’s was a combination of two film locations.  The exterior is a Los Angeles bar known simply as Black.

lalaland21

LOCATION: 6202 Santa Monica Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90038

Here is the angle from the sidewalk seen in the film.

lalaland18

The interior is a bar far from Los Angeles, located in Long Beach, known as The Blind Donkey.  After the success of the film, The Blind Donkey hosted an evening based around the film, where they once again dressed the space to appear as it did in the film.

Here is the stairway Mia walks down to enter the bar.

lalaland19

Here is the stage where Sebastian played his piano.  In the actual bar, it’s just an enclosed seating area.

lalaland20

LOCATION: 149 Linden Ave Ste. B100, Long Beach, CA 90802

As many locations as we’ve covered here, there are still countless more seen in the film.  We hope we have covered most of the highlights.

The Big Lebowski (1998)

“The Big Lebowski,” one of the great comedies of the Coen Brothers, shot all around the greater Los Angeles area.  Several of the movie locations are surprisingly difficult to gain access to however, so if you’re a fan of the film and want to check out the places where it was shot, just be aware it may be a more difficult process than you’d expect.

First, we start with the apartment of The Dude, played famously by Jeff Bridges.  The exterior apartment complex can be found in Venice, while the interiors were shot on a sound stage.  The complex has since been renovated, but still bears some resemblance to how it appeared in the film.

biglebowski13

LOCATION: 606 Venezia Ave, Venice, CA 90291

The apartment complex across the street can also be seen in the film.  This complex is frequently mistaken as being The Dude’s.

biglebowski1

LOCATION: 609 Venezia Ave, Venice, CA 90291

Just outside of the apartments on Venezia Ave, looking down toward Zeno Pl, you’ll see where The Dude confronts Da Fino, the brother shamus.

biglebowski2

LOCATION: Venezia Ave, Venice, CA 90291 (in front of The Dude’s apartment)

The famous bowling alley in the film no longer exists.  It was the Hollywood Star Lanes, formerly located at 5227 Santa Monica Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90029.  The building was torn down in 2002 to make way for a children’s elementary school.

The Big Lebowski’s mansion consisted of two locations.  The exterior was shot at 10231 Charing Cross Rd, Los Angeles, CA 90024.  It is a private, gated property, closed to the public.  The interior of the mansion is the Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills.  The City of Beverly Hills actually owns the property, which is routinely used for filming.  The outside grounds are open to the public, but getting inside is more difficult.  Due to hosting productions and private events on a regular basis, only a few times a year does the city open the inside up for public viewing.  It can be done if you are patient and keep an eye out for these select dates, however.

Inside the Greystone Mansion, this wall is where The Dude talks with Brandt, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, and looks at all of The Big Lebowski’s awards and achievements, including his “Little Lebowski Urban Achievers.”  It’s known as the “Breakfast Room” inside the mansion.

biglebowski5

LOCATION: Greystone Mansion, 905 Loma Vista Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Brandt is seen walking these hallways of Greystone Mansion several times in the film, as are The Dude and Walter, played by John Goodman.

therewillbeblood2

Another famous location inside of Greystone Mansion; The Dude talks to the distraught Big Lebowski in front of this fireplace, where The Dude is hired to find the kidnapped Bunny Lebowski.

biglebowski6

The very same room was used in Paul Thomas Anderson’s “There Will Be Blood,” as Daniel Plainview’s office, where his son visits him late in the film.  It was also seen in “Air Force One.” A little tip for Lebowski fans, this room can usually be seen without access inside the Greystone Mansion.  If you go to the front of the building and look through the windows, usually there are no curtains and this room, which is on the ground level, left of the main windows, can be seen.  The hallway Brandt walks down can also be seen through a doorway window, just around the corner to the left of this room, near the fish pond.  Only the Urban Achievers room truly requires access inside the mansion to be seen.

biglebowski9

The coffee shop where Walter tells dude he can “get you a toe by 3 o’clock… with nail polish” is Johnie’s Coffee Shop Restaurant in midtown Los Angeles.  The restaurant actually closed many years ago, but still operates as a filming location.  It has appeared in “Reservoir Dogs,” “American History X,” “Miracle Mile,” “Gone in Sixty Seconds” and many more.

biglebowski11

LOCATION: 6099 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048

The Dude, Walter and Donny pay a visit to Larry Sellers’ house, “near the In-N-Out Burger.”  It’s in front of this home that Walter destroys the red corvette.  Today, the home is partially obscured by trees.

biglebowski3

LOCATION: 1824 Stearns Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90035

Late in the film, The Dude pays a visit to Jackie Treehorn’s house.  In the film, the property is shown as being right on the beach.  Those beach scenes were filmed at Point Dume in Malibu.  In reality, however, the house is located in the hills of Benedict Canyon, nowhere near the beach.  It’s the Sheats-Goldstein House, one of the most unique and famous houses in Los Angeles.  It’s actually located just above Cielo Dr, where the Manson Family’s infamous murder of Sharon Tate and four others took place.  The house regularly hosts photo shoots for models and at one time even allowed porn shoots.  In 2016, the property was donated to LACMA, which hosts occasional events there.  The house is tucked away at the end of a cul-de-sac, down a long, private drive and is not visible from the street.  Unless you are a professional photographer or model, the only way to get onto the property is most likely, similar to Greystone Mansion, to keep your eyes peeled for a rare, public invitation.

biglebowski4

LOCATION: 10104 Angelo View Dr, Beverly Hills, CA 90210

biglebowski10

The 40 Year-Old Virgin (2005)

“The 40 Year-Old Virgin” introduced us to the films of Judd Apatow, who would go on to make a string of hit comedies.  Andy, played by still Steve Carell, lives in this Studio City, California apartment, which still closely resembles how it appeared in the film.  The same building was used in the film “Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo.”

40yearoldvirgin1

LOCATION: 12012 Moorpark St, Studio City, CA 91604

Andy works in this shopping plaza in Encino, California.

40yearoldvirgin2

LOCATION: 17401 Ventura Blvd, Encino, CA 91316

The house where Trish, played by Catherine Keener, lived could be found in North Hollywood.  Sadly, it has since been demolished. The home was located at 4433 Cartwright Ave, North Hollywood, CA 91602.

The Karate Kid (1984)

The 1980s classic “The Karate Kid” shot mostly around the San Fernando Valley in California.  Surprisingly, many of the film locations are not only still standing, but still closely resemble how they appear in the film.  The major exception is Mr. Miyagi’s house, which was torn down.

Daniel Larusso’s apartment still exists in Reseda, California.  The apartment looks identical to how it appeared in 1984.  However, the neighborhood it’s located in isn’t the safest of areas.

thekaratekid1

LOCATION: 19223 Saticoy St, Reseda, CA 91335

thekaratekid2

Daniel embarrassingly arrives in his mom’s run-down car to pick up Ali at her house for a date.

thekaratekid3

LOCATION: 4072 Alonzo Ave, Encino, CA 91316

The two go on a date to Golf N’ Stuff, which is a real place and still open to visitors.  It’s located further south, down in Norwalk, California.

thekaratekid4

LOCATION: 10555 Firestone Blvd, Norwalk, CA 90650

The location of the Cobra Kai dojo can be found in North Hollywood.  The same location was featured in the film “Say Anything…

karatekid6

LOCATION: 5223 Lankershim Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 91601

A glimpse inside the dojo location.

karatekid7

Related articles: Cobra Kai

Pulp Fiction (1994)

One of the most critically acclaimed films of the 1990s, Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction,” was shot in Southern California. The restaurant that opens and closes the film was the Hawthorne Grill in Hawthorne, California.  Unfortunately, the restaurant closed in 1996 and is now an AutoZone. It could be found at 13763 Hawthorne Blvd, Hawthorne, CA 90250.

Vincent Vega takes Mia Wallace to the memorable “Jack Rabbit Slims,” which is not a real restaurant.  The interiors were built on a studio stage.  However, the exterior is in fact a real place, albeit not a restaurant.  Located in Glendale, California, the building was originally a bowling alley called Grand Central Bowl, which has long since closed.  Today, the building is owned by The Walt Disney Company, which owned Miramax, the company which released “Pulp Fiction.”  The building is part of Disney’s larger Grand Central Business Center, which consists of numerous buildings in the area used as business offices.  The building is actually tucked away behind a wall and fencing, but the wall is not very tall and it’s easy to get a view over top of it.  What is not so easily accomplished is getting a closer view of the building.  The property is only open to business staff, so the closest the public can get is the sidewalk.

pulpfiction2

LOCATION: 1435 Flower St, Glendale, CA 91201

Vincent Vega pays a visit to his friend Lance, played by Eric Stoltz, early in the film, in order to purchase some heroin.  After Mia Wallace mistakes Vega’s heroin for cocaine, she overdoses and is rushed to this house in the Atwater Village neighborhood of Los Angeles, for a very tense scene in which they give her an adrenaline shot.

pulpfiction3

LOCATION: 3519 La Clede Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90039

The building where Butch’s boxing match takes place can be found in Pasadena.  The marquee has since been changed.  The same building was also used in “This is Spinal Tap.”

pulpfiction11

LOCATION: 129 N Raymond Ave, Pasadena, CA 91103

Later in the film, after Butch has double-crossed Marsellus Wallace, he sneaks back to his apartment, located in North Hollywood, to retrieve his gold watch.

pulpfiction4

LOCATION: 11813 Runnymede St, North Hollywood, CA 91605

After a violent confrontation at his apartment, Butch is leisurely driving away, when a chance encounter with Marsellus occurs at this intersection of Fletcher Dr. and Atwater Ave., also located in Atwater Village.  Butch is facing NW on Atwater Ave. when he spots Marsellus crossing Fletcher Dr.

pulpfiction5

LOCATION: Intersection of Atwater Ave. / Fletcher Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90039

Butch quickly floors it and hits Marsellus, before getting in a car collision in the intersection.  Marsellus awakens and begins firing his gun at Butch, when a bystander is hit in front of Fosters Freeze, which is at the same intersection.  Forsters Freeze was also featured on the television show “GLOW.”

pulpfiction6

LOCATION: 2760 Fletcher Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90039

Marsellus chases Butch on foot SW down Fletcher Dr. from the same intersection.

pulpfiction7

LOCATION: Fletcher Dr., just past Atwater Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90039

Marsellus fires one last shot in the distance at Butch, who is standing at the corner of this building in Canoga Park.  This location is far away from the earlier shots in Atwater Villiage.  It is actually the corner alley next to the Zed’s Pawn Shop, in which both characters make a grave mistake in entering.

pulpfiction8

LOCATION: The alley left of Crown Pawn Shop at 20933 Roscoe Blvd, Canoga Park, CA 91304

Zed’s Pawn Shop is where things take a bizarre, ugly turn for Butch and Marsellus.  The real building actually is a pawn shop.

pulpfiction9

LOCATION: 20933 Roscoe Blvd, Canoga Park, CA 91304

Near the end of the film, Jules and Vincent find themselves in “The Bonnie Indecent,” in which they are in sudden, urgent need of getting rid of a body.  They arrive here at Jimmy’s house, played by Quentin Tarantino.  It is here they meet “The Wolf,” played by Harvey Keitel.

pulpfiction10

LOCATION: 4145 Kraft Ave, Studio City, CA 91604

The site of Monster Joe’s Truck and Tow can be found in Sun Valley. The area has changed some since filming took place.

LOCATION: 12143 Branford St, Sun Valley, CA 91352

Related articles: Reservoir Dogs (1992)Jackie Brown (1997), Kill Bill (2003), Django Unchained (2012), Once Upon A Time In… Hollywood (2019)

Seinfeld

Despite being famously set in New York, the exterior shot of Jerry’s apartment is actually located in Los Angeles, which is where the majority of the series was taped as well.

seinfeld1

LOCATION:  757 S New Hampshire Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90005

seinfeld2

seinfeld3

What can be seen in New York is the famous “Monk’s Cafe,” where Jerry and the gang were regulars throughout the series.  The restaurant is actually known as Tom’s Restaurant and can be found in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan.  The show only used the restaurant for exterior shots.  The interior of Tom’s bears no resemblance to the Monk’s restaurant set from the show, although it does feature some Seinfeld photos along the walls.

seinfeld33

LOCATION: 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025

To celebrate the show’s arrival onto streaming services, Hulu did a pop-up exhibition in New York and Los Angeles in late 2015, recreating the interior of Jerry’s apartment.

seinfeld4

Jerry’s apartment, 5A.

seinfeld5

The inside door, where Kramer so frequently popped in.

seinfeld6

The kitchen.  Everything was recreated, from the Superman magnet to the cereal collection.

seinfeld7

seinfeld8

The living room.

seinfeld9

The computer area.

seinfeld10

The kitchen table.

seinfeld11

The book shelf.

seinfeld12

The bathroom.

seinfeld13

The hallway.

seinfeld14

A recreation of Kramer’s photo studio, where he takes erotic photos of George.

seinfeld15

The stand-up comedy stage.

seinfeld16

The remainder of the photos are props from the show, starting with the famous restaurant booth.

seinfeld17

Puddy’s New Jersey Devils jersey.

seinfeld18

George’s sable hat, which Elaine buys on Peterman’s company account when she goes overboard with expensing personal items.

seinfeld19

The Bachman Pretzels container, from when Kramer gets cast in the Woody Allen film.  “These pretzels are making me thirsty.”

seinfeld20

The Superman figure.

seinfeld21

The script to the final episode, signed by the cast.

seinfeld22

The Frogger arcade machine.

seinfeld23

The pez dispenser.

seinfeld24

The Festivus pole.

seinfeld25

George’s pyramid, from when he visits the holistic healer.

seinfeld26

The Maestro’s wand.

seinfeld27

Bosco.

seinfeld28

The egg Kramer drops in Jerry’s kitchen, then blocks off with caution tape, rather than cleaning it up.

seinfeld29

The Tropic of Cancer book, which Jerry learns he is over 20 years overdue on returning to the library.

seinfeld30

The Junior Mints, as well as the photo of George’s boss, which gets botched when he attempts to erase himself out of the shot.

seinfeld31

The last supper painting.

seinfeld32