Roar (1981)

The 1981 film “Roar” has been called “the most dangerous film ever made” and may well be exactly that.  The film was created by director Noel Marshall and his then wife Tippi Hedren, who both star, after they drew inspiration to raise awareness against animal poaching while visiting Africa.  Marshall and Hedren began raising a variety of big cats at their home, eventually purchasing a ranch in Acton, California.

Using large, untrained animals, the film is scripted, but with the unpredictable behavior of the animals, it often feels like a documentary.  Initially shooting scenes in Santa Clarita, filming shifted to Acton and the troubled shoot, which involved 70 injuries to the cast and crew, continued on for 5 years.  Actress Melanie Griffith, daughter to Tippi Hedren, was among the injured, requiring facial reconstructive surgery after being attacked by a lion.

The film eventually saw release in 1981, but only hit theaters outside of the U.S. upon initial release.  However, 34 years later, it was finally re-released into theaters in 2015, including the United States, and has since gained a cult following.

Today the ranch in Acton, known as the Shambala Preserve, is still operated by The Roar Foundation, founded by Tippi Hedren.  The ranch offer tours, but reservations fill up quickly.

roar1

LOCATION: 6867 Soledad Canyon Rd, Acton, CA 93510

roar2

roar4