Titanic (1997)

The classic 1997 James Cameron film “Titanic” was of course filmed primarily on a recreated set of the famous ship, which was built at Fox Baja Studios in Mexico.  In 2017, however, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California held a unique exhibition on the ship, where it combined real artifacts from the sunken ship alongside props and sets from the film.  It was the largest collection of artifacts from passengers of the ship since the fateful night it collided with an iceberg a century before.

The exhibit has unfortunately since closed, but here we’ll take a look at some of the props, costumes and sets from the film that were on display.

This is the set of the famous scene where Jack, played by Leonardo DiCaprio, draws a nude Rose, played by Kate Winslet.

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Here are some props from the scene, including Rose’s mirror, butterfly hairpin and comb, as well as her “Heart of the Ocean” necklace.

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Here is Jack’s sketchbook and pencil case.  On top of the sketchbook is also the note Rose leaves for Cal, played by Billy Zane.  She places the note inside his safe, along with the necklace.  Her note reads, “Darling – Now you can keep us both locked up inside your safe.  Rose.”

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This is the set of Jack and his friend Fabrizio’s cabin, designed for third class passengers.

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Here is the Marconi Room, another set from the film, where the ship sent out it’s distress calls and communicated with other ships.  Without it, no one would’ve known why or where the ship had sunk.

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Jack Dawson’s suit as he boards the ship.

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Rose wears this dress while the ship is sinking.

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Molly Brown, played by Kathy Bates, wears this dress.

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Bruce Ismay, played by Jonathan Hyde, wears these pajamas and overcoat.

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Here is a dress worn by one of the first class passengers in the film.

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Moving on to more props from the film, here is the clock and cherub from the grand staircase of the ship, where Jack greets Rose.

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Some scale miniatures were also built for the film, including a 45 foot long model of the ship.  Here are some pieces from the miniature.

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The ax Rose uses to free Jack, who is handcuffed in his cabin.

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While the exhibit closed down in 2018, due to the enduring popularity of both the film and the history of the ship itself, these artifacts are bound to find their way into another, future exhibition.

We leave you with one last prop from the film, which was not part of the Reagan Library exhibit.  Rather, it can be found at Planet Hollywood in Florida.  It’s the piece of wood that Rose floats on at the end of the film.

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LOCATION: 1506 E Buena Vista Dr, Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Christine (1983)

In the 1983 John Carpenter adaption of the Stephen King novel, “Christine,” the director returned to his old South Pasadena stomping grounds, where he famously shot “Halloween.”  Those locations can be found in the same proximity as the exterior of the house where Arnie lives in “Christine.”

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LOCATION: 1037 Buena Vista St, South Pasadena, CA 91030

However, when people think of the film “Christine,” the first thing that comes to mind is of course the killer car.  The film follows a possessed Plymouth Fury as it wreaks havoc on it’s owner and those around him.  24 total Plymouth Fury vehicles were acquired for use in the film.  This was one of two stunt cars, which can be found at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California.  At the end of the production, the vehicle was set to be destroyed.  However, a buyer stepped in and rescued the car, using parts from other screen-used “Christine” vehicles and restored it back to it’s original condition.

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LOCATION: Peterson Automotive Museum, 6060 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036

Batman (1989)

While Tim Burton’s 1989 “Batman” film was originally considered to be shot at Warner Bros. Studios, the film instead primarily shot at Pinewood Studios, just outside of London, England.  However, the Batmobile from the original film can today be seen at the Warner Bros. lot, as part of their studio tour.

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LOCATION: 4000 Warner Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505

In 2019, the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles held a limited exhibition called “Hollywood Dream Machines: Vehicles of Science Fiction and Fantasy,” which featured one of the original, screen-used costumes worn by Michael Keaton in the film.

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LOCATION: Peterson Automotive Museum, 6060 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036

A couple models of the Batmobile can be found on display at Planet Hollywood in Florida.

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LOCATION: 1506 E Buena Vista Dr, Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Related articles: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Edward Scissorhands (1990), Batman Returns (1992), Ed Wood (1994), Big Fish (2003), Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children (2016)

Blade Runner 2049 Experience

At the 2017 San Diego Comic-Con, Warner Bros. hosted a “Blade Runner 2049 Experience.”  Visitors were invited to experience a VR tour of the futuristic world, as well as a set recreation, with props and actors interacting with you.  Here we offer some photos of the special exhibition.

First up, a view of the full structure, as seen from outside.

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The entrance to the building.

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Once inside, there is some concept art from the film on display.

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One of the actual Spinner vehicles used in the film.

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A recreation of the film set, featuring the streets of a futuristic Los Angeles.

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Vending machines, in which visitors were distributed free t-shirts for the film.

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Bibi’s bar, in which visitors could actually go inside for a free drink.

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Some posters for the film.

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Numerous props from the film were on display.  Here are some of Officer K’s, played by Ryan Gosling, LAPD issued Blade Runner items.

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Deckard’s, played by Harrison Ford, handcuffs and binoculars, used while hiding out.

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Eye scanner, used by Officer K to identify replicants.

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Some LAPD evidence bags.

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Items found in Officer K’s apartment.

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Some miscellaneous props used in a variety of scenes in the film.

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Memory spheres used to store Voight Kampff tests to determine if one was a replicant or not in the original movie, along with some everyday tools used by manicurists in the sequel.

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LAPD badges and handcuffs issued to officers.

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Deckard’s blaster, used in both the original film and the sequel.

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Luv’s blaster.

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Items from the marketplace where residents gather to shop and eat.

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Cocktail glasses used by Deckard.

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Cocktail bottles and glasses from Officer K’s apartment.

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Decorative accessories used to adorn the office of Niander Wallace, played by Jared Leto.

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Some costumes from the film.  First, a hazmat suit, helmet and boots worn by Sapper, played by Dave Bautista, to protect him from the harsh atmospheric elements while farming.

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Some sophisticated attire worn by Luv.

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Some colorful clothing worn by Mariettte as she cruises Bibi’s Bar.

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A custom designed coat with a specially crafted collar to protect Officer K from the elements.

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Iconic yellow rain jacket made with readily available materials, worn by Joi.

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Living a solitary life, Rick Deckard wears this casual t-shirt and pants.

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Related articles: Blade Runner (1982)

Breaking Bad

In the wake of the popular television series “Breaking Bad,” it’s difficult to even mention the city of Albuquerque, New Mexico without thinking of the show.  Albuquerque plays a central role in the series and there’s a vast array of filming locations scattered all across the city.  Here, we’ll take a look at those, as well as a some props and even a pop-up set.

First, we begin with one of the more notorious film locations; the Walter White house.  Beyond the notoriety of the house within the show itself, the real home has it’s own reputation, due to the sometimes adversarial owner.  While most of the time it’s fine to visit properties once seen in films or TV shows, on occasion, property owners of these locations are not receptive to visitors.  While that’s not exactly the case with the Walter White house, the owner could be considered particular to the acceptable ways in which visitors approach her home.  This is not without reason, however, as some past guests have abused their visiting privileges, by doing things like trespassing into their back yard, while others have even gone as far as throwing pizza on her roof, in a distasteful attempt to parody a famous scene from the show.  The pizzas in particular escalated to the point where series creator Vince Gilligan himself had to publicly denounce these acts and tell fans to stop doing it.  That’s not to mention the sheer volume of guests that visit the house, which was said to be dozens per day at the height of the show’s popularity.  So while there’s seemingly no harm in looking at a house, it is nevertheless understandable if the property owner has developed a low tolerance for intrusive visitors.  Since the show ended, the owners have made a habit of opening their garage up each day and sitting in front of the house, from dawn to dusk.  It isn’t often you’ll visit the property in the daytime where the owners won’t be perched out front.  They also installed cameras around the house, posted a “no trespassing” sign and erected a steel gate at the front door, in an effort to curb the repeated trespassing issues.  While the owner of the house can be friendly, she has also had some verbal altercations with visitors, if she feels they are being intrusive.  All of this, however, is not to say visitation is discouraged.  The owner has stated she does not mind fans of the show stopping by and taking photos, as long as they remain on the opposite side of the street and do not disturb them.  While one can make a valid argument that it’s perfectly legal to walk right up to the curb in front of the house and take a photo, doing so will likely provoke the ire of the homeowners, so please respect their wishes if you intend on visiting the property and you’re unlikely to encounter any issues.

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LOCATION: 3828 Piermont Dr. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111

Jesse Pinkman’s house requires a bit less discretion when visiting, as we are unaware of any animosity between the owners and fans of the show.

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LOCATION: 322 16th St. SW, Albuquerque, NM, 87104

Agent Hank Schrader’s house is located in this cul de sac.

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LOCATION: 4901 Cumbre Del Sur Ct. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111

Next we take a look at the infamous “Los Pollos Hermanos,” the restaurant owned by criminal mastermind Gus Fring.  Here we have photos from both the real location (a restaurant named “Twisters”), as well as a pop-up replica of the restaurant, which was used to promote the spin-off series “Better Call Saul.”  First, lets look at the actual location in Albuquerque, called “Twisters.”  There are a few of these restaurants in the area, so be sure if you plan to visit, you go to the one on Isleta Blvd, in order to see the location used in the show.

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LOCATION: 4257 Isleta Blvd. SW, Albuquerque, NM 87105

The counter inside at the real location, which features a small “Los Pollos Hermanos” sign.  You can also sit and eat at the table Walter White sat in, if it isn’t already occupied by another customer.

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This is a “Los Pollos Hermanos” logo painted inside the real Twisters location, on the wall beside the entrance door.  This was added by the “Breaking Bad” production and the restaurant allowed it to remain up.  They are very welcoming to fans of the show.

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Now we move on to what is a pop-up replica of “Los Pollos Hermanos,” which was built on an open parking lot space in Los Angeles for just a few short days, in promotion of “Better Call Saul.”  These are not photos of the real restaurant and the pop-up has long since been dismantled.

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A “Los Pollos Hermanos” restaurant sign built for the pop-up.

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Visitors to the pop-up were given a complimentary order of french fries and a cup of water, both bearing the “Los Pollos Hermanos” name.

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A mock application form was also given out to visitors of the pop-up.

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Back in Albuquerque and to the real show locations, here is a look at the office of Saul Goodman.

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LOCATION: 9800 Montgomery Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87111

A few businesses have come and gone from the location since the show aired, but the current restaurant actually has their front door made up to look like Saul’s office.

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The Whites’ car wash.

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LOCATION: 9516 Snow Heights Cir. NE, Albuquerque NM, 87112

Tuco’s headquarters, which is left in bad shape after a visit from Walter.  The real building is actually a coffee shop.

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LOCATION: 906 Park Ave. SW, Albuquerque, NM, 87102

This is Walt and Jesse’s RV from the show, which can be seen as part of the Sony Pictures Studio Tour in Culver City, California.  The show had 2 identical RVs for filming, one of which actually was destroyed on the show.  This is the only remaining RV from the production.

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Walter White’s vehicle from the show is also on display at the Sony Pictures Studio Tour.

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Next up are some props from the show, also seen on the Sony Pictures Studio Tour.  Included are Gail’s lab notes, Walt’s missing person flier, the stuffed animal that falls into Walt’s pool and much more.

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Last, but not least, we leave you with a couple of Bryan Cranston’s costumes from the show.  First up, this Heisenberg outfit can be found on display on the Sony Pictures Studio Tour.

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Another of Walter’s outfits can be found on display at Planet Hollywood in Florida.

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LOCATION: 1506 E Buena Vista Dr, Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Suicide Squad (2016)

Rather than the usual film locations, for David Ayer’s 2016 anti-hero film “Suicide Squad,” which was mostly filmed around Toronto, Ontario, Canada, we’re instead going to cover some props and costumes from the film, which were on display as part of the Warner Bros. Studio tour.

We begin with one of Jared Leto’s Joker costumes.

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Some Joker props from the film.

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Margot Robbie’s Harley Quinn costume.

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Harley Quinn’s hammer.

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Some Harley Quinn props.

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The Panda Man costume.

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Will Smith’s Deadshot costume.

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Jai Courtney’s Captain Boomerang costume.

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Some Captain Boomerang props.

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Diablo costume.

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Killer Croc costume.

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Katana costume.

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Rick Flag costume.

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Amanda Waller costume.

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Blade Runner (1982)

The events of Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner” depict a futuristic Los Angeles.  Present day has caught up and while the city may not look exactly as it did it the film, even decades later, the locations of “Blade Runner” still stand out as unique and interesting.  While most of these locations have been featured in many other productions, they remain most widely recognized for “Blade Runner.”  Here, we’ll walk through many of these locations.

Deckard’s apartment is a famous house in Los Angeles, located in the Los Feliz area, known as the “Ennis House.”  Only exteriors of the house are seen in the film, the interiors were built on a stage inside Warner Bros. Studio.  The house has been used in countless productions, including the original “House on Haunted Hill” (1959), “The Day of the Locust,” “The Karate Kid Part III,” “Black Rain” (also directed by Ridley Scott), “The Glimmer Man,” “The Replacement Killers,” “Rush Hour” and “The Thirteenth Floor.”  It has also been recreated on studio stages for movies such as “Predator 2,” “The Rocketeer” and “Mullholland Drive”  It’s been seen in the TV shows “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Twin Peaks,” as well as countless other music videos and commercials.

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LOCATION: 2607 Glendower Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90027

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Sebastion’s apartment is another very well known filming location, called “The Bradbury Building.”  Located in downtown Los Angeles, visitors are welcome to explore from the lobby area.  It’s well worth seeing, as the architecture is very unique and still clearly resembles how it appeared in the film.  Much like the “Ennis House,”  the interiors of Sebastion’s apartment were shot on the stages of Warner Bros. Studios.  Also likewise, “The Bradbury Building” has been seen in countless other films, such as “Chinatown,” “Wolf,” “Disclosure,” “Lethal Weapon 4,” “Pay It Forward” and “(500) Days of Summer.”  It’s also been seen in the television series “The Outer Limits,” “Quantum Leap,” “Mission: Impossible,” “CSI: NY” and many more, as well as several music videos and commercials.

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LOCATION: 304 S Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90013

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This poster that hangs in the lobby of the Bradbury.

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The tunnel Deckard drives through is the 2nd Street Tunnel in downtown Los Angeles, located between Figueroa St. and Hill St., beneath Bunker Hill.  The tunnel has been seen in many productions, such as “The Terminator,” “Demolition Man,” “Independence Day,” “Con Air,” “Kill Bill” and many more.

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LOCATION: 620 W 2nd St, Los Angeles, CA 90012

The police station is actually Union Station, a train station in downtown Los Angeles.  It has featured in many films as well, such as “Bugsy,” “Pearl Harbor” and “Catch Me If You Can.”

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LOCATION: 800 N Alameda St, Los Angeles, CA 90012

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We leave you with some props from the film. First, Deckard’s blaster, which was used in both the original film, as well as the “Blade Runner 2049” sequel.  The gun was on display as part of Warner Bros. “Blade Runner 2049 Experience” at the San Diego Comic-Con.

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Some memory spheres from the original film, used to store Voight Kampff tests to determine if one was a replicant or not.  These were also seen on the “Blade Runner 2049 Experience.”

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This miniature of the famous blimp can be seen as part of the Warner Bros. Studio tour.

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Related articles: Blade Runner 2049 Experience

Seinfeld

Despite being famously set in New York, the exterior shot of Jerry’s apartment is actually located in Los Angeles, which is where the majority of the series was taped as well.

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LOCATION:  757 S New Hampshire Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90005

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What can be seen in New York is the famous “Monk’s Cafe,” where Jerry and the gang were regulars throughout the series.  The restaurant is actually known as Tom’s Restaurant and can be found in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan.  The show only used the restaurant for exterior shots.  The interior of Tom’s bears no resemblance to the Monk’s restaurant set from the show, although it does feature some Seinfeld photos along the walls.

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LOCATION: 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025

To celebrate the show’s arrival onto streaming services, Hulu did a pop-up exhibition in New York and Los Angeles in late 2015, recreating the interior of Jerry’s apartment.

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Jerry’s apartment, 5A.

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The inside door, where Kramer so frequently popped in.

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The kitchen.  Everything was recreated, from the Superman magnet to the cereal collection.

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The living room.

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The computer area.

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The kitchen table.

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The book shelf.

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The bathroom.

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The hallway.

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A recreation of Kramer’s photo studio, where he takes erotic photos of George.

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The stand-up comedy stage.

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The remainder of the photos are props from the show, starting with the famous restaurant booth.

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Puddy’s New Jersey Devils jersey.

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George’s sable hat, which Elaine buys on Peterman’s company account when she goes overboard with expensing personal items.

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The Bachman Pretzels container, from when Kramer gets cast in the Woody Allen film.  “These pretzels are making me thirsty.”

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The Superman figure.

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The script to the final episode, signed by the cast.

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The Frogger arcade machine.

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The pez dispenser.

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The Festivus pole.

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George’s pyramid, from when he visits the holistic healer.

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The Maestro’s wand.

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Bosco.

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The egg Kramer drops in Jerry’s kitchen, then blocks off with caution tape, rather than cleaning it up.

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The Tropic of Cancer book, which Jerry learns he is over 20 years overdue on returning to the library.

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The Junior Mints, as well as the photo of George’s boss, which gets botched when he attempts to erase himself out of the shot.

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The last supper painting.

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The Shining (1980)

While most of Stanley Kubrick’s classic 1980 film was shot on a studio lot in England, a couple of the film’s most iconic sites can actually be found as real locations.

Perhaps the most majestic opening credits sequence ever laid to film is also the most majestic film location we’ve ever personally visited.  As Jack Torrance, played by Jack Nicholson, drives his family up the remote mountain road to the hotel, the aerial footage is breathtaking.  Looking at it in person, however, is even more breathtaking.

The road in question is Going-To-The-Sun Road, located in Glacier National Park, Montana.  There are a few entrances to get to the road.  Those looking for the opening shot over the lake will want to head to the western banks of Saint Mary Lake entrance.  You won’t have to drive far to begin to recognize the famous views.

Some advice for prospective visitors; leave early and plan to spend the day in the park.  Going-To-The-Sun Road spans nearly 50 miles of winding, mountain road.  It will take you hours, especially if you stop and soak in the many brilliant views to be seen, such as the glaciers, cascading waterfalls, towering mountains, beautiful wildflowers and active wildlife (you’ll likely encounter grazing, wild goats).  We’d also recommend you visit during the summer months, as parts of the road may close in the winter months.  There is an entrance fee into the park, but that’s nothing in comparison to what you get in return.  Having traveled the United States many times over, in our opinion, we can comfortably say that we consider Going-To-The-Sun Road in Montana to be the crown jewel and the most beautiful, scenic drive the country has to offer.

LOCATION: Going-To-The-Sun Rd., West Glacier, MT 59936 (inside Glacier National Park)

This is the point of Saint Mary Lake where the opening shot takes place.  It’s close to the St. Mary entrance of the road.

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A view of the start of the winding road, which runs along the mountainside.  The drive is  fun and never felt particularly hazardous, as long as you drive safely and the weather conditions are optimal.

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Another view of the lake, seen from the perspective of driving along the road.

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And lastly, a view of the road from much higher up the mountain.

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Moving on to the hotel itself, you’ll have to travel far away from the windy roads of Montana, out west to Oregon.  The avoid confusion, there are actually three hotels widely associated with the fictional Overlook Hotel from the film.  The first is the Stanley Hotel (located at 333 E Wonderview Ave., Estes Park, CO 80517).  This is the hotel the novel’s author, Stephen King, stayed at, which inspired the story.  King and his wife stayed in Room 217 in 1974 and were the sole, final guests of the season, before the hotel closed for the winter months.  The empty corridors and lack of other guests helped inspire the author.  In 2015, the Stanley Hotel added a maze outside, as an homage to the novel and film.  The 1997 TV movie version of The Shining filmed at the Stanley Hotel.

The second hotel associated with the film is the Ahwahnee Hotel in Yosemite National Park, California.  The interiors for this hotel inspired the set designs of the Kubrick version of the film.  Those sets were built at Elstree Studios in England, while the real Ahwahnee Hotel was never seen in the actual film.  As of 2016, due to a trademark dispute, the hotel has actually been renamed the Majestic Yosemite Hotel (located at 1 Ahwahnee Dr., Yosemite National Park, CA 95389).

The third hotel, the Timberline Lodge, is the sole hotel that was seen in the actual film.  The exteriors provided the outside views of the Overlook Hotel.   The Timberline Lodge can be found at Mount Hood in Oregon.  It should be noted that only a few shots of the actual hotel are seen in the film, which are establishing shots.  For all of the acted scenes, the production actually built a massive recreation of the Timberline Lodge just outside of their studios in England.

LOCATION: 27500 W Leg Rd., Timberline Lodge, OR 97028

Here is a look at the back of the hotel.

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Here’s a view of the front of the hotel, which is bustling with visitors, unlike the desolation seen in the film.

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Moving on to some props and memorabilia from the film, several were on display at the Stanley Kubrick exhibit in Los Angeles, which has since closed.

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The typewriter from the film.  “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.”

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The twins’ dresses.

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Danny’s sweater.

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A knife from the film.

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A model of the hedge maze.

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The final shot.

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Last, but not least, Jack’s axe from the film can be found at Planet Hollywood in Florida.

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LOCATION: 1506 E Buena Vista Dr, Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830