Corpse Bride (2005)

Some props from the 2005 Tim Burton / Mike Johnson film “Corpse Bride” can be found on display at Warner Bros. Studio as part of their studio tour. Here are miniatures of the characters in the film, along with some behind the scenes photos of the filmmakers using them in the film.

LOCATION: 4000 Warner Blvd, Burbank, CA 91505

Terminator: Salvation (2009)

Props from the 2009 sequel “Terminator: Salvation” could be seen at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, which ran an exhibit entitled “Hollywood Dream Machines: Vehicles Of Science Fiction and Fantasy” from May 2019 through May 2020.  Here is the 2017 Skynet Moto-Terminator bike seen in the film.  It is an autonomous, weaponized motocycle, which John Conner, played by Christian Bale, sets a trap to capture.

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LOCATION: Peterson Automotive Museum, 6060 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036

Here is a model of a T-800 Terminator used in the film.

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Fight Club (1999)

David Fincher’s 1999 film “Fight Club” was shot primarily around Los Angeles, California.  Early in the film, the unnamed narrator, played by Edward Norton, attends support groups for diseases he does not have.  He visits the St. Brendan Catholic Church, which has appeared in numerous productions, including “The Curse Of La Llorona,” “Spider-Man 3,” “Armageddon” and the Guns N’ Roses music video for “November Rain.”

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LOCATION: 310 S Van Ness Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90020

After meeting Marla Singer, played by Helena Bonham Carter, he follows her to this laundromat, where she takes clothes that don’t belong to her.  The laundromat is still in business.

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LOCATION: 4371 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90029

The vintage clothing store where she sells the clothes was located just across the street.

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LOCATION: 4314 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90004

The narrator’s apartment can be found near downtown Los Angeles.  It’s located just across from the 2nd Street Tunnel, a popular filming location seen in such films as “Blade Runner,” “Kill Bill,” “The Terminator” and many more.  Known as the Promenade Towers, the property consists of two main towers.  The one seen in the film is closest to the W 1st St overpass.  He calls Tyler Durden, played by Brad Pitt, from a phone booth at the front entrance between the two towers.

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LOCATION: 123 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90012

Fight Club begins at Lou’s Tavern.  The building was a real bar, located near Wilmington.  It had closed by the time the production came along, which added the neon signs.  Not long after filming completed, the building was demolished altogether.  It’s now just some empty land at the corner of S Figueroa St and W Harry Bridges Blvd.

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LOCATION: S Figueroa St / W Harry Bridges Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90731 (now demolished)

The building where Tyler holds a man at gunpoint and urges him to go back to school was also filmed at a nearby liquor store at 1109 W Harry Bridges Blvd, Wilmington, CA 90744, but was also demolished.

Tyler’s house, supposedly located on Paper Street, was a set built by the production on Neptune Ave in Wilmington.  It was removed at the completion of filming and is likewise now just empty land.

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LOCATION: 240 N Neptune Ave, Wilmington, CA 90744 (now demolished)

As Fight Club begins to expand, the club begins taking on homework assignments by trying to start fights with the public.  A man sprays a preacher with a hose as he walks by this tire shop.

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LOCATION: 505 N Avalon Blvd, Wilmington, CA 90744

Another public fight takes place in front of these geometric art pieces, found in the Citigroup Center in Downtown Los Angeles.  The same area was used as the exterior of the bank in “Heat.”

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LOCATION: 444 S Flower St, Los Angeles, CA 90071

The car dealership fight was filmed at 5151 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036, but the building has since been demolished, with a new building standing in its place.

As the assignments escalate, things go wrong when the space monkeys try to destroy a piece of corporate art.  This was filmed at Two California Plaza in Downtown Los Angeles.  There is no actual ball or fountain there.  To get to this area, look for signs for the Water Court from S Grand Ave.

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LOCATION: 350 S Grand Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90071

Three scenes were filmed at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Downtown Los Angeles.  The first is where Tyler appears in a corporate video, welcoming the narrator to his hotel room.  The second is when Tyler works in a hotel restaurant where he defiles the food.  This was filmed in the hotel’s Emerald Room.  In a third scene, Tyler threatens to cut off the police commissioner’s balls in the men’s restroom of the Regency Room.

LOCATION: 506 S Grand Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90071

Marla lives in the Hotel Bristol, also in Downtown L.A.

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LOCATION: 423 W 8th St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

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A computer store gets blown up in Downtown L.A., near the Millennium Biltmore Hotel.

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LOCATION: 501 W 6th St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

Video tapes are erased with magnets at a former video store on Wilshire Blvd.

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LOCATION: 6340 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048

Marla is put on a bus at the corner of S Broadway and W 8th St in Los Angeles.  The narrator is then seen walking towards the former Olympic Theater.

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LOCATION: 313 W 8th St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

The final scenes with the buildings collapsing were a CGI composite.

It’s unfortunate that some of the most iconic locations from the film were either sets, CGI or since demolished.  However, if you’re a fan of the film, there’s still a lot of locations to be seen.

Related articles: Seven (1995), The Game (1997), Panic Room (2002), Zodiac (2007), The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button (2008), The Social Network (2010), Mindhunter, Mank (2020)

Big Fish (2003)

In Tim Burton’s 2003 film, “Big Fish,” an older Ed Bloom, played by Albert Finney, recounts tales of his life to his estranged son, Will, as he is sick and dying.  The Bloom house, from which most of the tales are told, can be found in the town of Wetumpka, Alabama.  The house sits perched in close proximity to a street full of local businesses and it’s almost easy to confuse it as another business space, but it is a private residence.

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LOCATION: 401 E Bridge St, Wetumpka, AL 36092

One of the most underappreciated film locations we’ve ever visited is the fictional town of “Spectre,” which is actually Jackson Lake Island in  Millbrook, Alabama.  We can only conclude the location isn’t more widely appreciated due to it’s lack of proximity to any destination cities.  It’s a real gem if you can make it there, however.

The island is privately owned, but the owners are quite accommodating to visitors, charging a very modest fee and offering anything from short term visits to overnight camping.  The island is fully accessible by car.  Upon arrival, you’ll reach a gate where you must pay the small entrance fee.  There are signs posted for a number to call after paying the fee.  After calling the number, you are given an access code to open the gate.  The island in general is beautiful and quiet.  It’s a great place to camp, even if you’re not a film lover.  More often than not, when locations such as these are used for a film, they usually get destroyed at the completion of production and the owners do their best to discourage visitation.  Jackson Lake Island is a refreshingly opposite case.  The property owners fully embrace the island’s connection to the film and preserved much of the look of Spectre.  It really does feel like you walked straight into the film when you arrive.

Here are the trees where a young Ed Bloom, played by Ewan McGregor, first arrives at Spectre.  As you can see, the trees were artificial props, but still remain standing.

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LOCATION: Jackson Lake Island, Millbrook, AL 36054

A sign stating “Welcome to Spectre,” just like the one seen in the film.

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One of our favorite touches is the fact that there is still a line strung, with shoes hanging from it, just like the little girl does to all visitors of Spectre, so that they might never leave.  Clearly the number of shoes has multiplied since filming ended.  If you’ve got an old pair you’re willing to part with, you too can add your shoes.

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Not all of the buildings seen in the film are still standing.  The town is shown a few different times in the film, first as a vibrant community, then in a nearly abandoned state of disrepair and finally as a restored town, thanks to Ed Bloom.  The buildings left now do not exactly look vibrant, but it’s still a great experience walking through the fictional town.  Here we’ll run through the remaining buildings, one by one.

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Last, but not least, is of course the town church.  Yes, those are goats standing in front of (and underneath) the church.  They are quite friendly.

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As far as filming locations go, we’d rank Jackson Lake Island among the best we’ve ever visited.  From the friendly owners, to the modest prices, to the beautiful scenery and of course the extraordinary preservation to how the town appeared in the film, there really isn’t much more you could ask from a filming location.  It may be out of the way from your usual tourist destinations, but it’s well worth making a detour.

Related articles: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Batman (1989), Edward Scissorhands (1990), Batman Returns (1992), Ed Wood (1994), Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children (2016)