Grateful Dead House

Located blocks from the famous Haight-Ashbury intersection of San Francisco sits one of the most famous houses in the city, most commonly known as the Grateful Dead house.  First used by the band’s management, who also managed the house, they slowly started inviting members of the band to live at the house.  The Grateful Dead resided there from 1965 until 1968, including the famous “Summer of Love.”  There are many famous tales of the Dead at this house, such as member Bob Weir getting in trouble with the police for tossing water balloons from the roof.  One of the most famous photos of the band was also taken by Rolling Stone Magazine on the front stairs of the house.  Today it remains a major tourist destination, attracting dozens of daily visitors as an important piece of San Francisco history.

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LOCATION: 710 Ashbury St, San Francisco, CA 94117

High Fidelity (2000)

Championship Vinyl, where John Cusack’s character works in the 2000 film “High Fidelity,” was not a real record store.  In fact, for many years after the film completed production, the location sat closed and boarded up.  Found in the Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois, it is now once again being occupied by a local business.

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LOCATION: 1514 N Milwaukee Ave, Chicago, IL 60622

Namyangju Film Studio

Many people have taken tours of the Hollywood film studios, such as Warner Bros., Paramount, Universal, etc.  However, many other countries offer tours around their studios and backlots as well.  Here we’ll take a look at Namyangju Film Studio in South Korea, located in Gyeonggi-do, about an hour outside of Seoul.

LOCATION: Namyangju Film Studio, 138, Bukhangang-ro 855beon-gil, Joan-myeon, Namyangju-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea

The road to the studio.  You can find bus rides from Seoul that will take you straight to the studio.

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Inside this building is the studio and several exhibits.  You can go above this building to the outdoor grounds where many sets stand.

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The reverse view from atop of the same building, which is pretty spectacular.  As you can see, the studio is tucked away in the Korean countryside, far away from the city lights.

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One of the most internationally famous films to shoot at the studio was Chan-Wook Park’s “Joint Security Area.”

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The production built an entire, full scale recreation of the Joint Security Area, a highly militarized section of the border between North and South Korea, intended to hold discussions between the two sides.  Obviously filming a movie in the real J.S.A. would not be possible.  Even though the Chan-Wook Park film was completed decades ago, to this day, the set on Namyangji remains the go-to spot for pretty much all South Korean productions looking to film scenes set in the J.S.A.  We did a separate article on this particular set here.

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A tank and some military vehicles from the 2015 film “The Long Way Home” (a.k.a. “Seoboojeonsun”).

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A full scale ship from the 2014 film “Pirates” (a.k.a. “Hae-jeok: Ba-da-ro gan san-jeok”).

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There is also a set for an entire old, traditional Korean village at the studio, but it was being used for filming the day of our visit, so unfortunately our views of this area were limited.

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Some train cars.

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Some interesting paintings along the walls as you head into the interior portions of the studio.

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This contraption was sitting outside of the studio.

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A rope bridge in front of a blue screen, where visitors can simulate crossing a treacherous passing.

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Some film costumes.  The military costumes to the left are from the 2007 film “May 18” (a.k.a. “Hwa-ryeo-han-hyoo-ga”), while the costume on the right is from the 2007 film “Hanbando.”

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Some excellent models and miniatures.

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This photo does not do justice to how beautiful and intricate this miniature shipwrecked city is.

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The prop room.

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Some props and costumes from old Korean films.

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Some old Korean awards and honors.

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If you’re a film lover and find yourself in South Korea, it’s worth taking a visit out to Namyangji Film Studio.  We of course realize most people reading this will likely never make it out there, so we hope this post is the next best thing.

Malcolm In The Middle

The house from the TV series “Malcolm In The Middle” is located in Studio City, California.  Fans looking to visit the home will unfortunately be disappointed, however, as the property has since been so heavily remodeled and expanded, it now looks nothing like how it appeared on the show.  Here is a shot of it before the remodeling took place.

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LOCATION: 12334 Cantura St, Studio City, CA 91604

The Town (2010)

The 2010 Ben Affleck film “The Town” tells the story of a group of Boston bank robbers.  The filmmakers utilized some iconic Boston landmarks as recurring images throughout the film.  The opening shot is of the Bunker Hill Monument, located in the Charlestown neighborhood of Boston, which is where the film’s central characters are from.  The monument was built to commemorate the Battle of Bunker Hill.

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LOCATION: Bunker Hill Monument, Monument Sq, Charlestown, MA 02129

Another iconic Boston landmark seen in the film is the Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge, often referred to as the Zakim Bridge or Bunker Hill Bridge.  It too is located close to Charlestown.

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LOCATION: Interstate 93, Boston, MA 02114

The exterior of opening bank robbery in the skull masks takes place at the Cambridge Savings Bank in Cambridge, Massachusetts, located in Harvard Square, directly across the street from Harvard University.  The filmmakers had to use an alternate bank, the East Boston Savings Bank in Melrose, MA, for interior scenes.

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LOCATION: 1374 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138

Later in the film, as the robbers are dressed in nun costumes, they get boxed in at this intersection, where they engage in a shootout with police, before taking off down the surrounding, narrow corridors.  Here we take a look at the intersection from a few different angles.

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LOCATION: Intersection of N Margin St & Thacher St, Boston, MA 02113

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Fergie, played by Pete Postlethwaite, works at a a flower shop, which is now a hardware store.

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LOCATION: 111 Dorchester St, Boston, MA 02127

The film’s climactic robbery takes place at Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox.

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LOCATION: 4 Yawkey Way, Boston, MA 02215

 

 

Pretty In Pink (1986)

In the 1986, John Hughes penned “Pretty In Pink,” Andie, played by Molly Ringwald, lives on the wrong side of the tracks at this house.  While the film is set in a Chicago suburb, the house can actually be found in South Pasadena, California.  It really is located near train tracks as well.

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LOCATION: 1010 Hope St, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Steff, played by James Spader, throws a party at this Los Angeles house.  The same house can be seen in the TV series “It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia,” serving as Dennis and Dee’s mom’s house.

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LOCATION: 366 S June St., Los Angeles, CA 90020

Halloween (1978)

John Carpenter’s original 1978, classic horror film, “Halloween,” is one of those films that tends to inspire people to seek out it’s filming locations.  Nearly everything from the film can still be seen today, much of it within a small radius of one another.  These locations have been heavily documented over the years, but that won’t stop us from taking a look at some of the most iconic spots from the film.

Laurie Strode, played by Jamie Lee Curtis, lives at this house, supposedly located in Haddonfield, Illinois, but actually filmed in South Pasadena, California.

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LOCATION: 1115 Oxley St, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Another view of the house, from the corner of Oxley St and Fairview Ave.  The owners of the house are quite welcoming to fans of the film, which is always refreshing to see, even leaving Halloween pumpkins on their front porch year round.

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Laurie and Lynda are walking home from school at this street corner.

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LOCATION: Corner of Highland St and Fairview Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

They cross the street, whenever they feel they are being followed by a car being driven by a strange figure.  The camera looks back toward Fairview Ave, where the car first turns down the street.

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LOCATION: Facing the street approximately in front of 1014 Highland St, South Pasadena, CA 91030 (looking towards Fairview Ave)

Annie yells “Hey jerk, speed kills!” at the car, when it hits it’s breaks.  The camera in this shot is on the same street, now facing the opposite direction, towards Meredian Ave.  The house from a very different kind of film, “Liar Liar,” was shot on this same block.  John Carpenter would himself return to the same neighborhood for his 1983 Stephen King adaptation, “Christine.”

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LOCATION: Facing the street approximately in front of 1014 Highland St, South Pasadena, CA 91030 (looking towards Meridian Ave.)

Laurie and Annie are walking toward these shrubs, when they appear to see Michael Meyers looking out at them.

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They approach the shrubs and look behind them, only to see no one is there.

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LOCATION: 1019 Montrose Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

The Michael Meyers house was originally located at 707 Meridian Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030.  Since then, some apartments have been built in it’s place.  The original house, however, was spared from demolition at the last minute in 1987.  A South Pasadena resident, recognizing the historical importance of the home and realizing it was about the be demolished, purchased it for a mere $1, with the promise to relocate the house and keep it in tact.  It wasn’t moved very far away, just over on Mission Street, near some train tracks.  Later recognizing that the home had historical significance, the city of South Pasadena would go on to designate the home as a California landmark.  Many iconic movie locations have been demolished over the years, so it’s always nice to hear of stories where one was not only spared, but preserved and honored.  While fans of the film are encouraged to visit the house, it is currently occupied by a local business, who simply asks visitors to keep to the driveway area and refrain from attempting to go up on the porch or inside.

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LOCATION: 1000 Mission St, South Pasadena, CA 91030 (original 707 Meridian Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030)

Overall, if you are a fan of the original “Halloween” film, you’ll likely have an enjoyable time strolling around South Pasadena visiting these spots and it won’t even consume too much of your time.

Magnum P.I.

This 1982 Ferrari 308 GTSi was the actual car driven by Tom Selleck during the 1982 – 1983 season of the hit television series, “Magnum P.I.”  Set around the adventures of a Hawaii based detective, the car was typically filmed without the roof panel, in order to allow the cameras to film the action inside the car.  The car was also modified to fit Tom Selleck’s large, 6’4″ frame, by relocating the seat rails and removing the filler from the bottom seat cushion.

The car can be found on display at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, alongside several other iconic movie and television vehicles.

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LOCATION: Peterson Automotive Museum, 6060 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036